Which is better dome or bullet camera?

What is a dome camera?

A dome camera usually is an outdoor camera that has a round, semi-spherical housing. It offers 360° of coverage and typically comes in bullet or mini-dome form factors.

How does a dome camera work?

A dome camera often has a wide-angle lens, which allows it to capture images with very high detail. A typical dome camera can record images up to 600TVL.

The housing is also made of an optically pure material that’s designed not to distort the imagery or block any part of its field of view. And inside the housing are multiple sensing devices called CCDs (charge-coupled devices), CMOS sensors, or sometimes both together for greater image quality and less internal glare.

The multi-technology sensor will be chosen on how much each suits your project needs such as field of view, resolution, and sensitivity.

What is a bullet camera?

A bullet camera is an outdoor camera that has a slim cylindrical housing. It offers 120° of coverage and typically comes in dome or box form factors.

Note: Keep in mind that most manufacturers call their bullet cameras ‘mini domes’.

How does a bullet camera work?

A bullet camera is designed with a single lens, which is capable of capturing video in one direction. The enclosure typically rotates to adjust for the desired viewing angle and captures images that are transmitted over any network protocol such as TCP/IP or UDP/IP.

Bullet cameras have an infrared LED array that enables them to see in complete darkness once the light has been cut off from the scene via voltage control. A day/night sensor automatically switches between color and monochrome modes as appropriate for low-light conditions; though, some models also offer automatic switching based on available light levels for added flexibility.

What are the benefits of a bullet camera over a dome camera?

Bullet cameras have more flexibility in their installation orientation, whereas you can typically install a dome camera only horizontally or vertically. Bullet cameras also tend to be smaller and slimmer than dome cameras, making them an excellent choice for installations where a large camera would present an issue, such as near a wall or other space-constrained area.

Additionally, while both types of cameras may feature multiple resolutions depending on the model, these resolution options will vary from manufacturer to manufacturer. Bullet cameras often provide higher resolution at each level compared with dome cameras, which makes them ideal for applications where image clarity is critical such as video security monitoring license plate recognition (LPR).

Similarities between dome and bullet cameras:

  • Both dome and bullet are outdoor rated.
  • Dome cameras have a clear viewing area, so the camera lens is not covered at all times.

Bullet cameras have an opaque covering over the lens when not recording. This enables you to conceal the lens so that people cannot see it without looking for it specifically.

Differences between dome and bullet cameras:

  • Dome cameras typically feature 360° viewing options while bullets only allow for visibility in vertical directions; however this can also depend on the type of camera. Mini domes offer more flexibility than full sized ones, and certain types of bullets may provide more angles than others.
  • Bullet cameras have an opaque covering over the lens when not recording; dome cameras do not due to their design, but they are still sealed against tampering. Dome cameras may incorporate glass in the lens for added protection.
  • Bullet cameras typically include video analytics to help improve their performance; dome cameras are not designed with this functionality but can be integrated through third party options.
  • Some bullet cameras feature temperature compensation technology, which lessens the effects of extreme temperatures on image quality; most dome cameras do not have this option built in, although it is available with certain accessories.
    Bullet cameras tend to perform better in colder conditions where condensation or frost buildup could affect image quality or cause damage within the camera itself.

Are they different at all?

Both types prove ideal for outdoor surveillance applications due to their durability features, but each has certain characteristics that make them better suited to some environments or applications than others based on your needs.

Bullet camera lenses are typically more compact than those of domes, allowing them to blend in with the surroundings for increased privacy if desired.

Dome cameras may be preferred in some indoor environments where aesthetics or extra protection against tampering is needed since they come with sturdy metal enclosures that resist tampering.

Can I use a dome camera as a bullet camera?

You cannot convert a dome camera into a bullet camera because of its size and shape difference. Bullet cameras are designed with more flexibility in their installation orientation since they’re slimmer, but this is not possible with a dome camera that is sealed against tampering and therefore has a fixed position.

Mini domes may offer the best of both worlds by providing flexibility by allowing 360° viewing with outdoor protection; however, these tend to be slightly larger than many traditional bullet cameras and still don’t provide the level of mounting options as traditional domes cameras.

Can I use either type of camera for indoor applications?

Dome cameras can be used indoors in certain applications where robustness is required, but they are typically designed more for outdoor use.

Bullet cameras prove more versatile in indoor environments, particularly when cost or aesthetics are concerns because their small profile allows them to fit into tighter spaces.

Bullet cameras are also ideal in areas subject to vandalism since they are sealed against tampering with screws or wires.

What about software – what’s included with dome and bullet?

Software varies by manufacturer and model, but both dome and bullet cameras typically have an SDK available for programming their hardware. In either case, you can purchase software separately to meet your needs.

The difference in price aspect

Bullet cameras tend to cost slightly more than dome cameras, but this will vary based on brand and model. Some features, such as software integration or temperature compensation technology may be included in higher-priced options that include these upgrades.

Bullet cameras will often offer an HD image while some cheaper dome camera models provide only SD images. However, the main difference between bullet and dome lies within their form factor rather than just pricing differences.

The difference in installation

Bullet cameras may be preferred in some indoor environments where aesthetics or extra protection against tampering is needed since they come with sturdy metal enclosures that resist tampering.

Dome cameras can be used indoors in certain applications where robustness is required, but they are typically designed more for outdoor use. Bullet cameras prove more versatile in indoor environments, particularly when cost or aesthetics are concerns because their small profile allows them to fit into tighter spaces.

Bullet cameras are also ideal in areas subject to vandalism since they are sealed against tampering with screws or wires.

Warranty issue

Both types of cameras are covered by the same warranty period of one to three years, depending on the brand.

Remote control for both cameras

You can remotely view your home or office on a smartphone with both dome and bullet cameras. Dome cameras may have more mounting options so they’re not limited to the angle you choose when installing them, but this does come at a higher cost.

Resolution

Bullet digital cameras are available in 720p resolution for enhanced image quality, while most dome analog models feature 640×480 resolution that produces full-color live images at 30 frames per second (fps). However, some newer bullet cameras offer 1080p resolution for top-quality imaging.

Temperature range

Both types of cameras are designed to operate under extreme heat and cold conditions (-22°F to 140°F), but dome cameras may offer wider temperature tolerance depending on how they are installed or their model.

You can expect an outdoor bullet camera to work in temperatures ranging from -22°F to 122°F, while some models may reach a lower operating temperature of -40°F. The latter is suitable for use across the United States. However, the ideal environment for these cameras lies between 50 and 104 degrees Fahrenheit (10 and 40 degrees Celsius).

What about accessories – what can you buy for a dome or a bullet?

Accessories vary by model. Bullet cameras typically have a smaller lineup because of their size, but you’ll find the same available from manufacturers as those made for dome cameras.

Dome cameras are bigger and typically have more advanced features, making them ideal for professional applications such as law enforcement and casinos where advanced functionality is required. In either case, you should be able to use any accessory designed for one camera on another with some minor adjustments to the mounting setup.

Some removable lenses also offer options between standard and wide-angle, which enables you to choose based on your application’s needs.

Do dome or bullet work better in specific outdoor scenarios?

Both types of cameras prove effective in a wide range of outdoor scenarios, but bullet cameras tend to be the better choice if aesthetics are important because their sleek profile allows them to blend in with any environment. The best solution is often determined by your specific needs and which features you require based on the type of installation.

Which size do you need?

Bullet camera sizes vary by manufacturer and model; most companies that produce bullet cameras also manufacture mini domes in addition to traditional-sized dome cameras. Bullet cameras typically include video analytics features for improved performance in certain outdoor scenarios; these are not typically available for mini domes.

How do you know which one to choose?

The best solution is often determined by your specific needs and the type of installation; dome cameras prove more versatile with greater flexibility in an indoor environment, but it’s also important to consider cost and aesthetics when choosing between bullet or dome cameras. Bullet cameras are sized based on the lens that comes included as part of their standard package.

You can opt for a standard (also called “wide-angle”) lens for more versatility at a distance with greater pixels per foot, or you can buy a fisheye lens with fewer pixels per foot and a tighter coverage area if you want to reduce costs and improve your camera setup time by reducing the amount of equipment needed during.

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